71939_424990770922074_1410928534_nVermont has a rich tradition of food production. The Green Mountain state is famous for its small farms. Many may visit Vermont in the winter months for skiing and snowboarding but for farm-fresh eating, summer is the ideal time to be in Vermont (although you could also make a strong argument for autumn or spring for that matter). In The Vermont Farm To Table Cookbook: 150 Recipes From The Green Mountain State, Tracey Medeiros gathers the best of the state’s rich bounty.

Medeiros sources recipes from local food producers, restaurants, and inns. The recipes each incorporate a bit of what makes Vermont unique. Maple syrup, apples, and other New England flavors including roasted vegetables figure prominently. A hearty breakfast hash features bacon and potatoes but also apples, butternut squash, and Brussels sprouts. The recipes can be made without going to Vermont or using local fare but the use of local products helps reaffirm the book’s food loyalty.

Seen through Medeiros’ eyes, Vermont is a foodie paradise where everyone from local community farms to world-renowned destinations such as The Essex Resort & Spa has specialties involving fresh produce and artisan meat and dairy. Cheeses in the book go far beyond Vermont cheddar and include Tarentaise, chèvre, Gruyere, bleu cheese, Pawlet cheese and more. Even a local vodka, Smuggler’s Notch, makes an appearance in an updated version of penne alla vodka.

In addition to being an excellent cookbook, The Vermont Farm To Table cookbook could also serve as a culinary guidebook. Pictures from Oliver Parini showcase both the food and the state’s extravagant beauty. A directory in the back of the book lists the food purveyors used and their recipes, perfect for planning your own Vermont odyssey whether it’s a trip to the state or a meal composed of the local specialties.