Starting Nov. 15, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, is hosting an exceptional exhibition dedicated to Norwegian painter Edvard Munch, who famously painted “The Scream”.

Edvard Munch (1863-1944) believed that his artistic breakthrough occurred around 1913 at the age of 50. Throughout his career, the Norwegian painter regularly revisited subjects from his earlier years. “Self Portrait: Between the Clock and the Bed”, painted between 1940 and 1943, was one of his final such works and can be used to put the artist’s other works into perspective. The painting depicts the artist’s bedroom, with a door opening to the studio beyond, and Munch, emotionless, between the grandfather clock and the bed.

In total, the show will feature 43 works, created over 60 years of his career, including 16 self-portraits and works that have never before been seen in the United States, these are: “Lady in Black” (1891); “Puberty” (1894); “Jealousy” (1907); “Death Struggle” (1915); “Man with Bronchitis”(1920); “Self-Portrait with Hands in Pockets” (1925-26) and “Ashes” (1925).

The paintings span the artist’s career, from the early days to his later years.

Born and raised in Norway, Munch was one of the most celebrated and controversial artists of his generation. With only a brief formal training in painting, Munch was largely self-taught. He was a prolific artist, creating around 1,750 paintings, 18,000 prints and 4,500 watercolors, as well as sculpture, graphic art, theater design and film.

“Edvard Munch: Between the Clock and the Bed” runs from Nov. 15, 2017 to Feb. 4, 2018, at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, in New York.