Finally Karl Lagerfeld fans will be able to shop his creations from his eponymous brand with ease this festive season. The brand’s website Karl.com is launching an e-commerce feature in partnership with Artnet.com. Karl has also designed three unique handbags that will be available for bidding along with the original sketches to mark the launch. karl-e-commerce02Consumers worldwide will be able to shop online for clothing, accessories, and much more beginning this November as the site will go live in multiple languages. Understanding the importance of catering to the online fans, Karl Lagerfeld will be selling for the first time on its e-commerce shopping site since the brand relaunched in 2012. Till now, its products were made available on Net-a-porter.com, Luisaviaroma.com, Stylebop.com, Zalando.com and the Web stores of Harvey Nichols and Harrods.

karl-e-commerce04WWD reports that the shop on karl.com will offer a far wider assortments of women’s products, including the entire accessories offering, up to three-quarters of the ready-to-wear range, plus licensed products including fragrances, watches, eyewear and novelty items. The online Karl store will also unveil new designs every two weeks, and occasionally feature capsule collections developed especially for the channel, kicking off with a Karl Around the World range inspired by the designer’s travels.

karl_lagerfeld_artnetPier Paolo Righi, chief executive officer of Karl Lagerfeld Group BV, states that their online shopping platform “resonates with our core customer, who is very connected, young-minded and modern….We know there is a big audience out there that wants to buy our product.” He also emphasizes on their expansive reach, “We’re going global, in 97 countries, with five languages, including Japanese.”

The unique bags designed by Karl to mark the launch are to be unveiled on November 2, with bidding opportunity from November 5 -10.  “I wanted something different from the bags we have in the shop,” Karl said. “They are unique pieces, and will not be reproduced after.”

WWD And Artnet